Talk Description to Me

Episode 43 - Photomicrography

March 20, 2021 Christine Malec and JJ Hunt Season 2 Episode 43
Talk Description to Me
Episode 43 - Photomicrography
Chapters
4:24
Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition
18:38
Under the microscope
Talk Description to Me
Episode 43 - Photomicrography
Mar 20, 2021 Season 2 Episode 43
Christine Malec and JJ Hunt

Ever wonder what skin looks like under a microscope? How about hair? Or snowflakes, or sand?! This week, Christine and JJ examine award-winning photographs taken through microscopes, and describe a few clickbait closeups, too!

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/TalkDescriptionToMe)

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever wonder what skin looks like under a microscope? How about hair? Or snowflakes, or sand?! This week, Christine and JJ examine award-winning photographs taken through microscopes, and describe a few clickbait closeups, too!

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/TalkDescriptionToMe)

JJ Hunt:

Talk description to me with Christine Malec and JJ Hunt.

Christine Malec:

Hi, I'm Christine Malec.

JJ Hunt:

And I'm JJ Hunt. This is talk description to Me where the visuals of current events and the world around us get hashtag in description rich conversations.

Christine Malec:

In a previous episode, we described the actual look of the Coronavirus under a microscope. And at the time, we both agreed how interesting it would be to do a whole episode on the visual world from a microscopic perspective. And we've had some listener interest expressed in that too. And it just so happened that recently I came across something in my Twitter feed that I sent to JJ and it was a competition sponsored by Nikon, the camera people in the field of photomicrography, micrography, we both had to practice that. We're still working on it. So this is photographs taken from the perspective of someone looking through a microscope. So this is the world in in very miniature, very small scale form. And we're going to we're going to talk about several of the images in in that competition. Which one. But, JJ, I'd like to start by asking, does this stuff look real? When you look at these images? Do you have a clue what you're looking at? Does it even look like something in the real world?

JJ Hunt:

Great question. So a lot of it depends on how magnified it is. So some of the stuff that's like at four times magnification, sometimes that's recognizable. But then when you get into like 10 times magnification 20, 30, 63, there must be a standard microscope that is 63. Because a lot of the the images that I'm going to be describing today are at 63 magnification. And at that point, it really isn't recognizable, then you're really into the the inner workings of a thing. And it becomes quite surreal. These landscapes, they really are like surrealist landscapes at that stage.

Christine Malec:

Yeah. When you were looking as a whole, like when you first sort of open the page, did you tend to look at the images first? And then the text about what they are? Or did you want to look at the text for those ones?

JJ Hunt:

Yeah, I would, I mean, the first thing that jumps out are these quite striking images. And they are quite striking a lot of them are in brilliant colors with black backgrounds. Because a lot of the a lot of the objects that are being or the cells or whatever is being investigated, there are filters involved, and there are stains that are involved. So that one element of whatever you're looking at stands out in one way or another so that the colors are almost neon, they're these neon colors, against black backgrounds in these wild arrangements. And so the images are quite striking. And then I usually would then say, wait a minute, what is this and then you look at the title, I was like, Oh, god, that's what this is. Very few times. I mean, unless it was unless it was a recognizable object very few times. And even then actually, I should say, if it is a recognizable object, and you're but you're seeing it in a different way you're seeing inside of it through it. It's like there was one image of a you know, a fish, a tiny little fish. And you're you're kind of inside of it. It's like looking like a colorful neon X ray of this fish. And you're seeing elements of it that I don't understand, I don't have the scientific background to say, Oh, those are the lymph nodes in the I don't even know. So you have to look down and read. Okay, what's going on in here and then you can start to pinpoint the various elements that are inside these photomicrography images. So the Nikon small world photo, my chronography competition is specifically about photographs through a light microscope and not an electron microscope or light microscopes. And these are images that are taken for scientific purposes. So the the scientists and researchers who are taking these images are looking for something and so they use different filters and different stains and dyes to enhance or separate. Do you know to differentiate between one element and another and so it starts off being precise. scientific purposes, and then it is it becomes. They're just beautiful images or startling images.

Christine Malec:

So let's dive in what were some of the striking winners that you saw.

JJ Hunt:

So some truly beautiful ones. Let me let me start with this one favorite of mine. This is a soil fungus at 63 magnification. So this is one of those words, bright neon colors, kind of muted neon colors, in this case, on a black background, and this is a tangled web of these muted neon tubes, so tubes in blue and purple greens and oranges. And there's a depth to it. So some of these tubes are quite close to us, and some are further away. And some are thinner and some are thicker, and they're really quite tangled, it looks kind of like a bizarre pneumatic tube transportation system on an alien world, right, like you hop in the blue tube and zip around, and you get in the orange tube and zip around.

Christine Malec:

Hey wait, that's probably what it's sort of is!

JJ Hunt:

Maybe that kind of is what's happening in the soil! That's right. And in the middle of this image, just kind of down from center is this egg shape. And inside this egg shape are these colorful flecks of white and teal, orange and purple. And this is this is these are spores. This is uh, it kind of looks like a colorful, egg shaped snowglobe. Like you can imagine holding it and rattling it and all these little flecks floating around in there just is really quite lovely. There's another image I quite like this is that a head of a moth bogong moths B o g o n g Bogong moth at the five times magnification. I mean, I'm gonna I'm going to be talking about it as if it's a human face, just for the sake of orientation, but it doesn't look anything like a human face. So it's, I'm gonna say it's in profile, because you can see one eye. And so it's I'm guessing from the side. And this moth looks furry at this magnification like a furry orange, white and black creature kind of like a looks a bit like a tiger having shaken off like a bathwater, you know? Oh, it's so that the hairs that these this free hair sticking up all over the place in orange and black and white. And the one on the side of the head is relatively massive, I mean, just huge takes up the majority of the side of the face. And it's a globe like half a globe with a very precise dappled service surface. Pardon me, and you can zoom in on it. Because these images are so clear, you can really zoom in and see all these tiny, perfect little, almost like they look like divots, they might actually mean I can't tell if they're concave or convex. But it looks almost like a golf ball. Have you ever felt a golf ball with all the little divots on it looks like that except the divots do are 1000s were on the golf ball there might be hundreds.

Christine Malec:

Is that what's meant by a faceted eye?

JJ Hunt:

I believe so, I believe so.

Christine Malec:

I've heard that used to describe insect eyes, faceted eyes.

JJ Hunt:

There's something about the perfection of this the way the surface is covered entirely and precisely and it's a dark gray color, like looks like there's a screen over it like a mesh screen. And then there's a promiscuous, so this is the the tube that's used for sucking and it's coiled up. So it curls down from the what I'm going to call the front of the face. And then it's wound into a tight coil, under what I'm going to call the chin and and it's like it's really curly cued up and you can imagine when it's required when it's needed. It stiffens in straightens. And then when it's not needed, it comes in curls back up under this chin area. And it's like it looks like the tiniest, thinnest thread like tube all coiled up under there really, really quite cool. So then there's a there's a human cell and this is at 63 magnification. And this image looks like a nest with an egg in it. And this is a nest of microtubules and they are brilliant orange and color there threadlike. So it almost looks like a tangle of hair. But there's some order to it. So there's a ring at the outside edge of this nest. So it looks, you know, you can imagine a swirl of hair around and around and around and around and around. And then across the bottom, or maybe it's the top, there's a, there's a web of these threads. And that's why I say it looks like a nest because it's thicker at the sides thinner across the bottom. And in the middle, well, it's tuck, it's tucked in against the side up at the top. But inside this nest, is the nucleus. And it's an egg shaped, mottled, like a cyan or like a teal blue color, it almost looks like a glowing teal colored Full Moon, but in an egg shape. And again, the colors on this, that they're not they, they're clearly tweaked. But I don't know if it's a filter or dyes. But they're just a brilliant orange, this like neon glowing kind of orange color, and the cyan, teal blue. It's really it's, it's quite beautiful. The next one, I've got brain cells, these are brain cell connections in the next image. And this again at 63 magnification. And this one looks like again, a black background. And it looks like kind of had two different things, I couldn't decide which it looked more like it either looks like two flash points, or bursts of lightning that are spread out in all directions. Or it looks like two tree stumps that have illuminated root systems that you're seeing from overhead. Right. So you're looking down at these two dots, these tree stumps, and there are root systems spreading out in all directions from these tree stumps. So these are the connections the roots are the connections between the hippocampal neurons, the brain cells. And the one in the upper right, this is a the the circle shape is in a hot pink color. And sprouting from it. Its network of roots are again, hot pinks, and then they get more purpley. And there are main branches and sub branches and they crisscross they spread all across this entire black background. And near the lower right the same kind of system but in a silver white color. So in it's got fewer branches with a slightly raised elevation, so it's a little bit closer to us. So they overlap the kind of more fuchsia colored purple colored root systems. And I'm guessing this is a case where the researcher probably added a dye to one to be one color and a dye to the other to be the other color. So that they could be seen separately distinctly. Otherwise, they would just be a real tangle of roots.

Christine Malec:

So if you had to guess from one emanating from one of the central points, like the trade the neurons, could you make some estimate of how many tendrils or whatever are expanding out from that?

JJ Hunt:

Oh, wow. So if you ever plant a plant and you shake the dirt off of the root ball, you're holding on to it, you'll be able to feel the thicker kind of is. So like I would say like major routes 1,2,3,4,5, maybe half a dozen major routes, and then off of each of those, another like two or three sub branches off of each of those. And then tiny little hair like a branches off of those. Yeah. And then so then it's kind of skipping aside. There's only one photo in this competition that was not of a natural object. Almost everything was a natural object, but someone did a nine times magnification image of nylons, like stockings.

Christine Malec:

Oh!

JJ Hunt:

Really interesting. So it's this, at this magnification, you can see the weave. And it's a weave of is these like iridescent, pinkish, orangish threads on a white background. So it kind of at this weave looks a little bit like a chain link fence, made of threads, but the threads have a really plasticky feel to them. And maybe it's because they all have black outlines. And then they're colored in it looks like they're colored in with with a marker and then they have thick black outlines. But you know, what they remind me of is the quality of it. Do you remember in the 1980s these rubber, I think they were called jelly bracelets.

Christine Malec:

Oh ya!

JJ Hunt:

Madonna would have them all up her forearm? This was a real thing. There's this kind of quality to them. Everything looks rubbery, it looks false. It's interesting. It's decidedly different than the natural things like we saw in the first image the tubes in the soil fungus There are these colorful tubes, but there's a natural quality to them, there's a little bit of imperfection in them. They, they waver in thickness and whatnot. Not these ones. There's a there's, there's something that's precise about these end end, false plastic rubbery about these really interesting. And then hum wound around the chain link are these like long golden coils that look almost like like old fashioned telephone cords, you know, super, super tight wound coil coils. And those are in like a this golden color. But again, really, they're iridescent. And the way they are woven around the chain link it like looks almost like vines on a chain link fence. Really, really interesting. Yeah.

Christine Malec:

Apart from from women's nylons, which are a travesty, because they're so shear that they're weak. But nylon does have a reputation for tensile strength. And That must be why

JJ Hunt:

Yeah, yeah. This this this grid, this chain link grid, and with the with the support exactly that. Yeah, really, it's really cool. And then someone we had a request from someone, I think was on Twitter, asked me about human hair, looking at human hair under the microscope, and there was actually one in this competition, human hair at 20 magnification. And this is one strand of brown hair, and it's got a knot in it. And that's what's being focused on in this image is this not Oh, and it looks like a beefy brown leather belt. So like a leather belt that's got that's got a bit of girth to it, it's a little bit thicker. So imagine it's like a slightly flattened tube, if that helps, you know, understand the dimensions of this thread this hair. And when you zoom in on the surface of this hair, it's cracked and slightly scaly, a little bit like leather. And there's a golden quality to the brown color. And the knot itself is fairly tight. And in quite perfect. And it's it's oddly satisfying this not like it there's something very smooth about the curves, like the edges of the hair are very, very smooth. And and the golden color is very appealing. And the knot is quite tight. But it doesn't look strained. It's it's a very oddly satisfying image of this one single not against a black background. Yeah, kind of cool.

Christine Malec:

His hair flat, does it have a flattened dimension to it? I always think of hair as sort of just a thin like a symmetrical tube.

JJ Hunt:

Yeah, I do too. But in this image, it certainly looks more and when you can see when it's when it's in its knotting curve like so when it when it's curving around itself. That's when you have the opportunity to see the three dimensionality of it. If it's lying flat, it's a little hard to tell when it's curving around it. That's why I say it looks. So if I was gonna say, pasta, spaghetti would be a perfectly round tube.

Christine Malec:

Yeah.

JJ Hunt:

And fettuccine would be really flat.

Christine Malec:

Mm hm.

JJ Hunt:

This is more like linguini. It's somewhere in between, right? So it's a little, it's rounded, but slightly flattened. of that. If that if that helps.

Christine Malec:

Yeah.

JJ Hunt:

Okay.

Christine Malec:

So this competition is based on things that are seen through a microscope. And I don't know if anyone else will remember. But I remember in high school, sort of, or whatever part of school where you, you start looking for microscopes. And I think they always start with things like onion skin, or a drop of pond water or something. So we thought we'd go back to some of the basics of things that you can look at through a microscope and what you would see if you did that. So JJ, what what ideas Did you have around that?

JJ Hunt:

Yeah, I did exactly that. Just like what are some fun things to look up? Right. And so when I started doing this, I kind of went down a bit of a, you know, a Google rabbit hole. And so some of the images that I saw were, you know, more scientific leaning, and I would trust those sources. And then sometimes you would get, you know, the clickbait like the 20 most outrageous things seen under a microscope. Oh, I couldn't help myself sometimes.

Christine Malec:

Come on, we're dying to know what are they!

JJ Hunt:

Okay, so I started off with things like sand and snowflakes and skin so snowflakes there's a there are a couple of there artists really who are who go out and they capture snowflakes in a very precise way. And then run inside and look at them under the microscope and take pictures of them

Christine Malec:

Ooooh!

JJ Hunt:

And they're beautiful. If you imagine the most, like, perfect Walt Disney doilies carved out of diamonds and ice, that is actually what snowflakes look like, under a microscope, they are just these perfect little gems with lots of symmetry, lots of repeating patterns and diminishing patterns. So patterns that are thicker and fuller near the center that then fade and get smaller as they reach the edges. And they look like they're made out of cut glass or really diamonds, right? Even when they are imperfect, they still look quite perfect. So some of these snowflakes are quite simple and elegant, right like almost like thin star shapes. But with you know, without big chunky points with very thin long points, almost like pine needles, right. And that can be the core. And then sometimes you take that initial star shape made out of very thin pine needles, and you add maybe a second tear of stars on to each branch. So on the in the middle of each branch, maybe you get another separate star shape on each branch in a symmetrical pattern. And then maybe there's a third layer of those tiny stars. And then maybe on the tips, the very ends, the tips of each one of those branches. There's a shape that's like, like a spade shape, or even a leaf shape on the tips. very clean, very crisp. So you get these, they really do look like doilies carved out of cut glass. They're just crisp and clean and beautiful. And then there's sand, I always love sand. I'm one of those guys in a beach, I'll scoop up a handful of sand and just like play with it in my fingers, I love the feel of it, the texture of it. And when you're holding sand in the palm of your hand, depending on how coarse or fine it is, you can get a sense of the composition of that sand. But if it's really fine, you you can't at all, when you look at sand under a microscope, you really find the composition you really see how varied it is. So depending on where you are in the world sand is going to be made up of you know, rocks or shells that are, you know, more of this kind and less of that kind, but it's almost always going to be varied. So each grain of sand is unique. It's like a unique, tiny rock or a unique shell. And you get like honeycomb looking items. You get these translucent looking like colored glass pieces. Some of them are round, some of them are conical, some look like marble, some look like stone, like miniature stone boulders. super rare, like varied and random. You know all in one little tiny micro teaspoon of sand.

Christine Malec:

Why doesn't anyone ever say no to grains of sand are the same?

JJ Hunt:

Yeah, that's a good question. Because it very much is that like no two grains of sand are the same.

Christine Malec:

I had no idea about that. I really didn't. I didn't know they were so interesting.

JJ Hunt:

And then skin. Of course skin is just one of those natural things like you said every in science class is one of the first things you look at because, you know we're covered in it. And it can be a little bit unnerving to look at skin under a microscope. And so here's where some of the you know the more click-baity images start to come into it. When you start to zoom in on skin, at first it looks quite leathery, right like you zoom in and you can see what we would all consider our imperfections. You can see how dry it is. You can see the wrinkles and how leathery it is. Maybe you can see the hair follicles sticking up, or a little discoloration for a freckle or liver spot or a poor Oh my God pours the hair these how these balls of dirt that greasy dirts that you can see it you know, just bulging out of the surface of the skin. It can look really it's in very unflattering at a certain depth. And so then you go a little bit deeper, right. And then you start getting these color enhanced images of the dry outer layers. So when you start to look at the layers of skin, especially if it's dry or dead skin, you can see the dead skin cells. And they look like it looks like a cracked desert floor like shale rock. so thin, irregular almost like scales, that skin cells and they're just layered in blanketing a surface and they look again, it's super unappealing. really dry desert like, and then one of the most disturbing images I saw. So I found a Reddit image of skin after being penetrated by a needle by a syringe. And I'm not a needle guy. So this was tough to see, oh, this is like, this is a white person's skin. So the skin tone is very pinkish. And the whole looks like a cave like a like a hole in the ground. And deep, and it is black pitch black. And around the outside edges, like the rim of this hole are these shale like flakes of skin in a in a darker pink color, like that looks a little, like livid, a little angrier around the rim of this. And because of the angle that this image was taken out, it's not perfectly overhead, you can see the inside set, like one side of this hole going down, which again, gives you a sense of the depth of it. And, you know, if you were looking at this as a black and white image, or like, you know, just a regular tan color, you could dismiss it as a landscape, and you would be okay. But because it's this pink color, this it's the color of a Crayola, like skin colored flesh tone pink. It is so fleshy and human. That is that's kind of the side from Crayola. There's nothing else like him in the world. It is so human. It's really, it's really disturbing.

Christine Malec:

Yeah, sorry, as I know, is not a needle guy. Those you probably want to move on right now.

JJ Hunt:

God, the number of times... I can't tell you the number of times I'm watching or describing a movie and there's a needle scene and they do a close up and I'm like, "oh man, again!?" There's always a needle scene and they always show them closeup. And I got to watch it and time. It's terrible.

Christine Malec:

It's hard to be JJ!

JJ Hunt:

I know, my life's tricky. So let's move on to something that's super bizarre. And just totally clean the palate. A cat tongue. Cat tongue.

Christine Malec:

Oh, wow.

JJ Hunt:

Okay, so you've had a cat lick your hand before, right?

Christine Malec:

Sure it's rough.

JJ Hunt:

You can feel it's very, very, very distinctive. Well, that's because the surface of a cat tongue looks like a blanket of 1000 cat tongues. When you zoom in on a cat tongue it's like tiny barbs. But each one of those little barbs is itself a tiny tongue.

Christine Malec:

Ahhh! This is not helping me. I'm starting to get creeped out.

JJ Hunt:

It's so weird. There are these infinite zoom special effects in psychedelic movies where you zoom in on something and it's just made of the same thing like you zoom in on a cat tongue. And it's made of cat tongues. And if you zoom in on each one of those cat tongues, they're made of cat tongues. It's just this never ending blanket.

Christine Malec:

I think that's fractal.

JJ Hunt:

That's exactly Yes, it's a it's a cat tongue fractal.

Christine Malec:

Ewww! Okay, that's way more gross than the needle.

JJ Hunt:

Ha ha ha. And then there's muscle tissue. So I looked at muscle tissue. This is really neat. This is like a cut end of muscle tissue. And so it looks kind of like a bundle of like copper wires with a silky filmy outer layer. So imagine you're about to cook spaghetti and you take a small handful and you tap it on the counter so that that bundle of spaghetti is is orderly all lined up. And if you look at the ends of it all those tiny little points the ends of the spaghetti that's what this looks like this little bundle of tiny little dots that are all individual fibers.

Christine Malec:

Yeah, okay.

JJ Hunt:

So the muscle fibers, the muscle tissue is it's more flexible, it's a deep pink color. And then around the outside. One of the reasons I thought of it being like a like a bundle of copper wires is because usually with with bundled wires, there's a there's an a plastic coating on the outside and this kind of has that coating on the outside. But this is like a thick, sticky cobweb that's what it looks like on the outside of this bundle of muscle tissue. Really, really interesting. Yeah.

Christine Malec:

Oh, is there a color associated because I know there's red muscle and white muscle like slow and fast which is a color associated with this one?

JJ Hunt:

This image that I have, it's like a it's a pinky red so it looks like a little bit red around like each one of these. Going back to the strands of spaghetti each one of the pieces of stuff It would be red on the outside of pink in the core. So you can say yes it is this Pinkie ready color to it. And then the, the, the the outer layer, this thick sticky cobweb is white like a gray white on the outside. Yeah. And then the last one that I got here was um, so this is one. Once you hear it, you can't unhear it. Well, thanks for that! Just letting you know.

Christine Malec:

Lay it on us. Go ahead

JJ Hunt:

So... dust mites.

Christine Malec:

Oh man, all right.

JJ Hunt:

Dust mites. So dust mites under a microscope are so notoriously gross. So they're these plump little bodies. And they have these scraggly hairs sticking out all around their body. They're kind of like whiskers, and the legs. I think there are like eight legs on these little creatures. And they look kind of like crab legs. So these diminishing segments that end in these, like little tiny claws, and the heads of dust, dust mites. They come to a point that look a little bit like a cross between a beak and a claw. These four segments that open and close and I imagine they open and close like the head of the Demi Gorgon from Stranger Things. I don't know if that's actually true. But that's that's how I that's how I picture these claws and these little tiny creatures and that usually the images where you can find these things in you know, magazine articles or online articles about why you should be vacuuming more often. They're always like, you know, walking along the a bed of dust that is like a thick gray blanket of of nice, thick cozy dust for these tiny plump little guys go back to the needle that's far more comfortable.

Christine Malec:

Yeah, sure. That was pretty harmless, right. So you sort of talked about a rabbit hole with the with certain types of images. But do you find that? What's it like for you personally looking at them? Does? Is it kind of a rabbit hole where you're like, wow, I want to see more? Or does it creep you out? Other than the needles?

JJ Hunt:

I like that some of this stuff. It's really fun. And sometimes it's fun, because it's like, "I had no idea". I had no idea that that's what that would look like. And sometimes like when you're looking at things like dust, dust mites and things like that. The idea that you're you're taking a look at a at a little creature or an insect or something that you thought you may be new, but you really don't. I love that element of it. Like when you get in close on some of these things. And you realize that these tiny little creatures are, they really are just miniaturized huge creatures, they have legs, their legs have, they have some substance and they have some detail to them. You know, there's really no difference if you took one of these tiny creatures and blew it up to be the size of a cow. And you took a cow when you shrunk it down to be the size of a dust mite. There interchangeable, right? The details. They're all there. They're all the same. There was a you had mentioned a film that you had, really enjoyed. Was Microcosmos?

Christine Malec:

Microcosmos. I remember when it came out in the I think it was in the 90s. And it's filmed in my chronography kind of style. And it's all about insects. And I was even before I knew what audio description was back in the 90s and I though "Oh, if only I could get this movie described."

JJ Hunt:

Well I took a look at some of the clips from that. I haven't seen the whole film, but there are some clips of it on YouTube. And that was my first my immediate, you know, reaction to that was how some of these tiny, tiny little insects, these tiny little creatures in their environments when you when your camera zooms in on them such that they are blown up to the size of cats and dogs. Or in some cases, if you're watching it in a movie theater, they would be blown up to the size of like rhinos and elephants. I mean, they when you see them at that level of detail, they really are just like cats and dogs or rhinos and elephants there's really no difference. So like the skin on the body of a snail is just like the height of an elephant. It's just as leathery. It's just as detailed you can see the little that the you know the cracks and crevices in the skin. It's just slimy or it's a snail it's slimy or the elephant but otherwise it's got that same leathery, like hide the head of a horned beetle, which actually really does have a curving horn at the front and a leathery head plate. I mean how is that different than a rhino It's exactly the same just one happens to be miniature. And one happens to be huge, but the, the body parts, they are just as detailed they are just as you know, well planned by nature doesn't matter the size or scale, right? Like, we don't happen to have a large scale equivalent of a caterpillar on Earth. But when you see a caterpillar, a tiny Caterpillar eat a leaf, with their, you know, hairy bodies, and they're chomping little mandibles, I mean, it's really not that far off from a nibbling rodent, right, the actions the same, it's it's exactly the same. It's just that one's tiny and one's huge. And, and that's it. If we change the scale the size of these things, they would be, you know, they're otherwise identical.

Christine Malec:

That's trippy. I remember the, the I don't even know what to call it. But the feeling I got when I first read about the structure of the atom, because I went, that's just like a solar system. Yes. And it gives me this weird sort of profound, shivery. Like, ooh, sense of the Connect, that is exactly what you're talking about that? Yeah, microscope sort of shows us the world, same world in a different scale.

JJ Hunt:

Yeah, I one of the images that I looked at for this, I didn't end up using it because it was a model. Not not a pure image from a microscope. But you know, an image from microscope combined with data sets and whatnot to create what is now considered the most detailed understanding of a human cell. And you look at this thing, and it's... it's a metropolis. Like, it looks like the overhead view of a thriving city. There's so much interaction, there's so much going on in this. And there are parts that look like stadiums and parts that look like rivers and parts that look like orderly suburban neighborhood.

Christine Malec:

We hope you're loving the show. We really enjoyed the challenge of putting together a new episode each week. To ensure that our efforts are worthwhile. We need to reach as many people as possible. That's where you come in, help spread the word. Maybe send a podcast link to three friends, post about the show on local listservs and Facebook groups. Perhaps tweet about a favorite episode and tag some followers you think might like it, or show your love by becoming a patron. The broader our reach, the longer we can stay Boyd and keep afloat. With your support. We'll be around for a long time. Thanks for listening and staying connected on social media. It's what makes this so rewarding for us have feedback or suggestions of what you'd like to hear about. Here's how to get in touch with us. Our email address his talk description to [email protected] Our Facebook page is called talk description to me. Our website is talk description to me.com and you can follow us on Twitter at talk description.

Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition
Under the microscope