Talk Description to Me

Episode 80 - Scooters, eBikes, and Hoverboards

December 04, 2021 Christine Malec and JJ Hunt Season 3 Episode 80
Talk Description to Me
Episode 80 - Scooters, eBikes, and Hoverboards
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Love 'em or hate 'em, personal vehicles are everywhere.  These days, people are zipping across town on silent e-bikes, delivering takeout on electric kick scooters, and coasting through neighbourhoods on seemingly magic skateboards. In this episode, Christine and JJ describe the visuals of personal transportation devices, from mobility scooters to hover shoes! 

Support the show
JJ Hunt:

Talk description to me with Christine Malec and JJ Hunt

Christine Malec:

Hi, I'm Christine Malec.

JJ Hunt:

And I'm JJ Hunt. This is talk description to me where the visuals of current events and the world around us get hashed out in description rich conversations

Christine Malec:

I was walking in my neighborhood with a sighted friend the other day and something went by on the street. And I didn't have a clue from the acoustic signature what it was. So I said, you know, what was that any kind of peered behind and he said, that is a bicycle with a combustion engine. And I was completely floored, like, what, and he actually said he'd never seen anything like that before either. But it made me think about how many strange manifestations of wheeled vehicles must be on the street that I don't even know about. And so today's episode idea actually came from from JJ and talking about all of the different kinds of things I can make on vehicles, I'm not really sure what to call them that are on city streets. Today, and of course, an a serious note, some of these are of a major concern for blind and low vision people because they are either unregulated or they are silent or they pose some genuine safety threats. And I did have an E scooter experience on the sidewalk and I went that thing is a menace because it's silent. And yeah, anyway, so we thought we would just do a mostly fun kind of survey of what's going by what what manifestation says The wheel turned into, on city streets on so everything from utilitarian to, to fun and funky. And so, JJ, should we start from the top down? Like maybe start with some of the bigger ones?

JJ Hunt:

Yeah, let's go from like big to small. These personal transportation devices are there all kinds of things, there are essentially miniature cars that are one person vehicles where you use them on the sidewalk, and there are everything all the way down in size to things that are no bigger than a shoe but are in fact, vehicles unto themselves. So I mean, there's, it's, it's, it's a it's a totally different market a lot these days are a lot of these are electric, which is you know, good in some ways, but silent, so problematic and others. But yeah, you can also take like, I've seen those to the, the motors that you can basically attach to the frame the inside of the frame of a bicycle. And it turns you see it yeah, there are a handful. I mean, they're they're a little bit antiquated. We kind of jumped over that step because the electric stuff is is so easy to acquire now and cheap to run. But but you know, slapping a you know, a little motor on the inside of your bike. Sometimes they really rumble.

Christine Malec:

Yeah, that's, that's not a motorcycle, but it's not a car. I was completely flummoxed? I do have a question before we dive dive in, though, which is when you look around on the streets today, I mean, I guess it happened gradually. But does it kind of look like a 1950s version of the future?

JJ Hunt:

Yeah. In fact, that was the precise thing that made me think of this as an episode I saw someone going by on a on an electric kick scooter. And it was something about the stance, the person's posture was upright and calm. And they were rounding a corner with such ease. That it really reminded me of like this Jetsons I would travel around on these devices. And even though this is still a wheeled device, it's making contact with the ground it visually, the you know, you remove those wheels and imagine some sort of magnetic system underneath that's, that's keeping them a few inches off the ground visually other than those wheels. It's exactly the same. And we're not quite at the numbers yet where there are dozens and hundreds of people like a massive percentage of people on these devices. But every time I am out on the street, I'm seeing a handful of people on kick scooters, and lots of people on electric scooter, motorcycles, electric scooter, bikes, those kinds of things. They're everywhere in Toronto. So yeah, this this technology. These technologies are really common, very common at this point.

Christine Malec:

And I'm curious about the age demographics because I think I've met a guy in his 40s I'd say late 40s and his mode of transportation In the city was a skateboard. Yeah. And he had a lot of great practical reasons why this made sense. And he wasn't a kid. But I thought one of the things people value of a cars is the insulation that it puts between them and the world and the the space it makes around you. And when you don't do that, when you use some of these vehicles that are, you know, much less structured, you give you give that up. And so my perception is that all of these innovative things are all young fit people doing something adventurous, but maybe that's not quite as true as it once was.

JJ Hunt:

Yeah, I mean, I think you're right, the more open the device that tends to be skewers to a younger age group. But there are lots of people who use electric scooters who are younger, who just find them to be you know, more convenient, more comfortable ways to go. Same with mobility scooters, and there are, you know, people in their 40s 50s and 60s who I see using kick scooters, especially kick scooters with seats, which are kind of like miniature versions of mobility scooters, we should probably start describing some of these Yeah, let's start let's start with some some specifics. All right, so let's talk about the the big boys in this group, the mobility scooters, so mobility scooters are really a seat on a motor that's attached to a platform that has handlebars at the front. So mobility scooters are tend to be four wheels, although you can have three two at the back one at the front. And the seat at the back is kind of like a like a fake leather desk chair seat. So back armrests seat and it's got a bit of a bit of a cushion to it and a bit of a pivot to it as well. So you know, you can not quite recline but there's there's a little bit of movement there within the seat and you can kind of swivel the seat from side to side for getting in and forgetting out. And that is mounted on the motor of this device. So that is mounted on a motor. And there are two wheels on either side. And these are not the size of car wheels, or bicycle wheels. These are more like the size of big lawnmower wheels. So probably in the in the neighborhood of 10 inches across and thick rubber wheels. And then there's a platform so that when your feet are, your feet are down in front of the chair on this kind of open platform. And then there are two wheels at the front with a handlebar stem coming up, maybe a basket hanging off the front and handlebars that are not unlike bicycle handlebars. And you know that's the that's the basic mobility scooter and they're kind of sleek these days. So they're like they've got molded plastics for the you know, for like hubcaps, and you know, and up the handlebar post and whatnot. But some of them are pretty swish, right? There's also a swish version where the front is a single wheel. And so it looks like the front of a moped with like headlights and the one wheel on a on an independent fork that's coming down so that it's easier to maneuver. So you know, it's a mobility scooter, but it looks also more like a moped. And then you get ones that are enclosed mobility scooters, and these are awesome. There are a couple of guys in our neighborhood who have them and they are decked out so it looks like a miniature car. There are sides with doors. There's a roof over the top and you can get them in various colors is a couple guys in our neighborhood who have these old these old guys who are soccer fans, Italian and Portuguese soccer fans, and they've got mobility scooters, in the colors of their soccer teams.

Christine Malec:

Oh!

JJ Hunt:

They're really swish. And then like they, you know, they ride up to the coffee shop, they park outside the coffee shop and they get out and lock the door with the BBB like they're locking their Mercedes or something. They are nice and inside. Basically the same as I've described, you know, you've got the seat, you've got the handlebars in the front, but you've got a door that can close and lock so you have that security, like you're saying that you're in case, but those these things can zip man like those things go fast. The mobility scooter can go anywhere from like four to 18 miles an hour. So if you're zipping down a sidewalk, these don't go on the road if you're going down the sidewalk at like 18 miles an hour and one of these things. He you can plow people over for sure that's fast. And then there are the electric scooter bikes. So this names get a little bit tricky here because scooter is a word that gets used for a whole bunch of different things. Bike is a word that gets used for a whole bunch of different things. So electric scooter bike, what I'm talking about here are things that look like motorcycles or mopeds but they are electric so there may be a little bit smaller in size. But they have a they have electric motors on them and they tend to have slightly smaller wheels than a standard motorcycle. So some of the electric scooter bikes look like racing bikes. You sit in them and you're leaning forward. So not a, you know, very comfortable position, not a good mobility device. The wheels are a little bit smaller than a standard motorcycle wheel. But the otherwise the styling looks like a motorcycle with like, you know, a sleek little windshield that comes up on the, with the headlamp and the front and molding plastic moldings on the side and a big shock between the rear wheel and the chassis. So it looks like a motorcycle. And then the other version of that which has basically the same functionality is more like a moped, which has a big seat, there's an opening where your legs sit in. So instead of leaning forward with your hands on the on the handlebars in front, you're sitting upright with your hands. So it's kind of like the difference between being on a 10 speed bike, bicycle. And being on like a wicked witch bicycle you're setting up, right? You know, we're very prim and proper. And so these are like moped style. And they tend to have like a basket or something, a hard case on the back so that you can, you know, put storage stuff on the back of the seat. And you can probably see two people on these things. Again, small tires fairly thick. So they can be used and even, you know, snowy and slushy weather. And those are kind of like the electric scooter bikes, that they are supposed to be in Toronto anyway, either on the road or in bicycle lanes, if they've got a speed limiter on them, they can be in bicycle lanes. They're not supposed to be on sidewalks, but they are sometimes

Christine Malec:

I'm wondering about, especially during the pandemic, the huge upsurge in delivery services. And it's probably not always possible to tell what's in someone's carry basket and where they're going. But do you have a sense that a lot of say Uber or other deliver DoorDash or other, you know, same day delivery services, that the drivers are using things like this, because I'm assuming they're cheaper than a car?

JJ Hunt:

Absolutely. What tends to be the vehicles of choice for delivery folks are either the E bike so not quite the electric scooter bike because they're a little bit more expensive, and their storage is actually not sufficient for deliveries. Whereas e bikes are cheaper, smaller and basically do the same thing. But you can wear your delivery backpack, and we can talk about that in a second or the kickscooter. The electric kickscooter is also very popular with these delivery services. Because the way the deliveries are made, you know, whatever DoorDash Uber Eats all those folks have essentially coolers, like cube like cooler, sometimes they're at their actual cubes. And sometimes they're a little bit they're not quite as deep. And so you know, their coolers you walk in, they walk into a store or a restaurant or whatever, they open it up, people put their plastic bags of taiko containers in there, they zip them up, and then they're worn like backpacks. And so you can stand on an electric kick scooter with one of these things on your back very, very comfortably and go from place to place. And so you're right instead of like, instead of making your deliveries in a car, which might cost several $1,000 Plus maintenance plus gas and take up a huge chunk of roadway and get stuck in traffic. You can be on a kick scooter, which costs a couple 100 bucks, no gas you just plug it in when you get home. And it takes up a no space and for better and definitely worse can zip up onto the sidewalk if traffic gets too bad. So yeah. I don't see them as much on the big electric scooter bikes. Sometimes I do see them on the E bikes. So the difference between the electric scooter bike, those ones tend to look more like mopeds or motorcycles. The E bike is really a bicycle frame with an electric motor on it either built into the frame or attached on to it. So you can just buy the electric motor as a separate kit and attach it onto the frame of a regular bicycle.

Christine Malec:

Oh my god. I didn't know that.

JJ Hunt:

I know it's really, really cool. Or you can get a bicycle that's got one of the motors built into the frame. So it's integrated into the system. And these ones sometimes have a really fat, chunky tires. So they can go kind of anywhere. I mean, the reason you don't have those big, fat, chunky tires on a bicycle that you're pedaling, is because it takes a lot more energy to to power them. But if you've got a little motor on, you're not as worried about it and the big chunky tyres means you can go off road, you can go through slush, and it's more comfortable, you know, so So yeah, and those ones you can sit on a bicycle basically sitting on a bicycle, and you've got your big backpack on there also cargo bicycles as well, which are much more popular now than they ever have been. So again, different models of these are like pedal bikes, but with cargo built into the design, so there are a couple of different kinds of things. See regularly, one, just imagine a regular bicycle, but with a really elongated front frame. So you've got rear rear wheel, and a rear tire and the seat and pedals, you know, essentially attached to the rear. And then you've got your handlebars like a regular bicycle. But then there's a three foot four foot wide extension of the frame out the front, before you get to the front tire. And balanced it on that long three foot section of frame is like almost like a plywood. Little pod that's open, and it's big enough that you can seat two kids in there and their shoulder straps. Yeah, whoa, yeah. And so they can sit in there. And you know, their heads pop up over the top of this. And there's a little door that they climb in and out of really cool. So the front tire is in front of a single front tire in front, that's maneuvered by the handlebars that are actually behind this pod that the kids sit in really cool. If you want one that's more for cargo than kids. But you can put kids in there as well, then you get the kind that is more like a cyclo like a Vietnamese cyclo, which is again, the one wheel at the back with the seat with the seat over the rear wheel pedals by the rear wheel. And then there are handlebars. And two wheels at the front that are wide spread apart. And between those kind of balanced between those is a box. And that's good for dumping cargo into or kids or whatever. But it's got a wheel on either side so that when you turn the handlebars, you're not just turning a single wheel at the front, you're turning double parallel wheels and that's how you maneuver those.

Christine Malec:

I don't think we have a lot of these in Toronto, but where would a rickshaw fit into that mix and actually what is a rickshaw?

JJ Hunt:

Cyclos that are used in Vietnam, they are rider behind and passenger or cargo in front and a rickshaw is the opposite. In a rickshaw the rider is up front, so you're sitting on the front part of a bicycle and then there's a really long chain that leads back to the two wheels that are parallel wheels at the back and that's where there's a seated and like a little booth for people to sit in behind you. So rickshaw is dry is peddler in front or polar because you can run a rickshaw as well. There in front and see close driver behind. And yeah, we don't have a lot of these in Toronto. And frankly, even the ones that are in most of most of the world now. You're finding electric ones or motorized ones, you know, the two stroke engine ones that are loud and and really polluting. But they're almost all motorized, they're there. It's harder and harder to find any that are pushed pedal now, anywhere in the world. Yeah,

Christine Malec:

I want to go on a bit of a tangent. Maybe I'll ask this and we'll come back to it. So you have time to think What's the strangest thing you've ever seen as cargo on one of these vehicles?

JJ Hunt:

So I've seen a couple of I remember being in Vietnam, and you know, of course lots of parts of the world. A motorcycle or a moped is a family vehicle. In the truest sense. Yeah, truly everyone in the family gets on these things at the same time. Yeah, exactly. You got to get kids sitting in front. So you got like a little bit littlest kid sits between the driver and the handlebars. And then the next smaller kids sit behind the driver. And then, you know, sandwiched on the other side of those kids behind is the other parent, right? So you've got like two adults, two kids and one toddler all on one moped. And so I you know, you see that quite regularly and I remember seeing all of that group on one moped, but instead of sitting directly on the seat, they were sitting on a splayed pig.

Christine Malec:

Oh my!

JJ Hunt:

So a pig had been butchered and one half of the pig was hanging down one side of moped and the other half of the pig was on the other and they were all just sitting going down. Going down the highway, puttering along. Yeah.

Christine Malec:

Wow. All right. I'll leave I'll leave you to stew on that while we talk about some other ones because I'm sure you have more anecdotes either here or in your travels around the world of things you've seen being transported and unconventional ways. So what's the next step below? You know, say an E bike?

JJ Hunt:

Yeah, so you got the E bikes and the cargo bikes and the you know all those and then you get into the the kick scooters. So and they're still called kick scooters, because you do for most of them need to actually kick once in order to get these in motion, but they're also just based on the old kickscooter So this is like, really what like 19 what were they 40s or 50s that kids would use these kick scooters. So two wheels, small wheels, again, about 10 inches maybe in diameter, one in front of the other parallel to each other. And then there's a board between them. That's maybe six inches across, maybe three feet long. And then there's a very thin handlebar that comes up from the front wheel. It's like a long post with the handlebars on top. So that's the basic kick scooter. If it's not motorized, you operate it by having one foot on the scooter. And then you kind of kick along the sidewalk, and you propel yourself along like that. But you put a motor on that now, and now you've got a vehicle. So the motor is basically the same size as the board, but mounted underneath it, and the handlebars have speed adjustments, and they have brakes on them. And there's also usually either a computer panel or there are and or there's a place that you can lock in your phone. So if you're an Uber driver, for example, or a delivery person, you probably have your phone mounted on the handlebars with like Ways, or maps or something, so that you are navigating the streets on one of these little devices. And fully, I mean, these things, zip, these things go the other like an average kick scooter goes like 15 to 20 miles per hour, that's an average one, you can get like trick ones. And you can get really, you know, kitted up ones that go much, much faster. The other thing you can do with these kick scooters is put a seat on the back. So it's exactly the same design, maybe the tires are a little bit more robust, maybe they're not as long because you're not standing on them, you're choosing to sit. But then there's like a very simple seat post and a bicycle seat on the back. And then you're sitting, so you basically turned a kick scooter, which would have handlebars that are about waist high, you've turned it into more of a mobility scooter by sitting down and just using the handlebars more, you know, closer to chest height, same technology, really simple device incredibly efficient in terms of moving a person through an urban environment at very minimal infrastructure. Like I mean, what is this thing cost three to $500 for one of these things, very easy to own, affordable. The problem is, we don't have anywhere to put them and like they don't go they're not proper, they don't do well in traffic because they are so small compared to a car so they're not safe there. They don't go on the sidewalk because it's a menace to everybody else on the sidewalk if they're going 15 to 20k or 1520 miles an hour. So that's the trick with these things. But these are, I would say the most in Toronto anyway, the most popular, lots of these kick scooters. Honestly, most times I'm walking in the city, if I'm out walking for 45 minutes, in a neighborhood in Toronto, and it's not snowing, I'm probably seeing a dozen or two of these things. Oh, yeah, and because they're silent, you wouldn't necessarily know and people ride them super casually, like the way you stand on them is like you know, one foot a little bit forward the other one a little bit back. And your body forward and your arms are relaxed at your sides and you're holding the handlebars which are you know, more or less waist high. And you're cruising and your body does have to move a little bit from side to side you're using your core strength for balance and for turning. But super casual. This isn't like people aren't anxious. I would like it freaks me out a little bit to see them zip along so fast with but there's a there's a calm that people tend to have when when riding these things are really it's amazing.

Christine Malec:

So are they going in the bike lanes them?

JJ Hunt:

Yeah, they're going into bike lanes or they're taking the road. You know, like if they need to they go right in the middle of the road. And if you're in a neighborhood street you're going as fast as a car. So it's easy enough for them to do that. If you're if you're you know if you're on a main street or on a busy really congested Street, then you get people who want to deep between vehicles and that gets a little bit dicey that's that's definitely harder.

Christine Malec:

Do you see some conflict or and big guity around? Do these vehicles comport themselves like bikes or like cars are like pedestrians because there's sort of a different set of etiquette and hard and fast rules that each of those are meant to follow on the street and so do you see tension or uncertainty or even conflict or grumpiness between how those interact?

JJ Hunt:

Yeah, I would say if all those words you used uncertainty and grumpiness would be the two that jump out at me.

Christine Malec:

Ha ha!

JJ Hunt:

Uncertainty because it's I mean, all these things are so new. We don't even have we don't even have the right names for all of them. Like they're overlapping. I don't even if I say an E bike, which do I mean, the one that looks like a motorcycle, the one that's a bicycle with them? Like, we don't know what any of these things? I mean, yeah, where are they supposed to be, I remember being on my bicycle and getting really mad at a, I was in a bicycle lane, and someone came by on an E bike that was basically a motorcycle and zipped by and I yelled at them, and they stopped. And they were like, "This is where the law tells me to be".

Christine Malec:

Yeah.

JJ Hunt:

We don't know where they're supposed to go. We don't know what to call them. And so a lot of that has to be figured out, especially if you're in an urban environment that is designed for cars and has no bicycle infrastructure, because in least if there's bicycle infrastructure, like bike lanes, then there's at least that middle ground place where they can go. And yes, there's conflict between cyclists and people on E scooters. But it's, they're more or less equal in terms of the damage they can do to one another. Right? So but if you put these things in a car lane, they are vulnerable, if you put them on the sidewalk, pedestrians are vulnerable. So that's where you know, that's where the real conflicts come. And, you know, we haven't even gotten to the wacky stuff yet, or the really like the super small devices, like some of these, like the hoverboards, or electric unicycles, or electric skateboards, these get tiny. Yeah, they're super small. So I mean, like the electric unicycle that's more, that's a bit of a show. It's a bit of a hipster thing. They're a bit of a novelty thing. It's one wheel that sits somewhere between a lawnmower wheel and a bicycle wheel. So probably like knee high? And it's got a case around the top half of it. So a single wheel -- single tire -- with a case around the top half, and two pads, foot rests one on either side. And so you stand on this thing about three inches off the ground, maybe four or five inches off the ground with a foot on either side, and the wheel the tire between your calves. And that's it. That's the whole device. There's no handlebars, there's no anything else you want to go. tip forward and it goes. You want to go backwards you tip backwards.

Christine Malec:

What?!

JJ Hunt:

Oh yeah.

Christine Malec:

You're kidding me. It's electric?

JJ Hunt:

It's a totally electric vehicle, plugs in. The case that's around the top half sometimes has lights on it or you know, looks like a like a sleek wheel on the back of a moped or something like that with plastic case with some, you know, flashy, whatever painting on it. But they are just single wheels that you stand on. And they transport you don't see a lot of those. But you do see a lot of hoverboards and electric skateboards so hoverboards again, terrible name because they don't hover their wheel devices. But the name hoverboard sounds cool. So that's where they went with it. But these are basically bow tie shaped platforms. And you ride on them with with a wheel on either end. So parallel wheels on either end facing frontwards.

Christine Malec:

Sorry, wait wheels are side by side?

JJ Hunt:

That's right wheels are side by side on the on the outsides, and they are facing forward. So parallel to the body. Yeah. And you stand on this bow tie shaped platform of foot on either side, right beside a wheel. And again, that's the whole device. This is basically what the Segway - remember the segways which were pretty 90s, early 2000s? A lot of these are made by segway. It's basically the same design as a Segway but instead of having a handlebar that would come up to like a chest high kind of panel that looked like a like a treadmill panel almost that you would hold on to this eliminates that and all you have instead is the platform at your feet and you want to go forward you tipped forward you want to go back you tip back. And that's it. That's the whole device they're not used as regularly as a you know, as a as an electric skateboard for transportation. These are more kind of novelty for fun for zipping around. But they're they're around I definitely see them like hey, I'm just going to go to the coffee shop and you know, people, zip zip to the coffee shop and one of these, but the electric skateboards they are absolutely transportation devices. And these are basically like skateboards like long boards. So not the little tiny guys but a long one may be you know, three feet long or longer. Wheels are probably like a little bit larger than your average skateboard wheel and maybe even pop up over the, you know, the sides are higher than the board itself. And the motor is underneath the skateboard so you don't even necessarily see it. It's not even visible on the board itself. And people who ride in these things love to, because they're they're operated by a hand a wireless handheld device, so they put them they in their hands in their pockets. So as you're zipping along the street on one of these things, you no one can tell when you've, you know, indicated on your on your remote control in your pocket that you want to go faster or slower or whatever. And these things move electric skateboards, they go fast. Like the average electric skateboard has a top speed of like 15 to 30 miles an hour. But people like really go to town and tweak them so that they can go over 60 miles an hour.

Christine Malec:

What!?

JJ Hunt:

A skateboard.

Christine Malec:

That's madness.

JJ Hunt:

It's crazy. It's highway speed. It's nuts.

Christine Malec:

That is madness.

JJ Hunt:

Yeah. And then there are hover shoes.

Christine Malec:

Oh my god!

JJ Hunt:

These are the smallest devices and they really are each is like so there are two devices, they are separate independent devices, each one a little bit larger than the than your footprint than like a large adult shoe. And they're kind of triangular in shape. So the longest side is the flat part that your your foot rests on. And then they point down underneath. But instead of coming to a sharp point, there's a roll or like a barrel wheel under each one. And it operates in the same way as the hoverboards. And that you tip forward or you tip back. And that's how you indicate where you want to go. You're not strapped into these things, you're just standing on top. And you go and if your right foot tips a little bit faster, like then your left, then you start to turn. See you got to figure out Yes, I do want I know these things, again, these hover shoes, they move, they go like six to 12 miles an hour. Yeah, and I've seen a couple of them around. They're not they're not regular most of the time. Those are like play things. Those are toys. And there are other crazy toys that are that are out there, like orbit wheels and whatever. But the from a transportation standpoint, I would say the smallest regular transportation device would be the electric skateboard. And those are all over the place.

Christine Malec:

Now you're a parent, JJ, what's going on with your kids? Do you have debates about these things? You know, I'm just sitting here going quivering with fear.

JJ Hunt:

Yeah, well, they don't have any of these things. They think they're pretty cool. One of the kids in the neighborhood has a babysitter with an electric skateboard. And so what the kids are allowed to do is lie down on the electric skateboard and then he cruises them around the park. So they don't have control over it. The babysitter stands back and moves this thing but then you know they say "Can you make it go fast. Can you make it go fast?" And what he does is he takes it to the side street and all the kids gather around and he puts no one on the skateboard. And he does this skateboard down the street. He lets it rip at full speed and it is breaking every speed limit in the neighborhood Just terrifyingly fast. I can' imagine riding on somethin that's going that unbelievabl fast. It would be terrifying

Christine Malec:

Is anyone using protective gear?

JJ Hunt:

Yeah, generally, uh, helmets, bicycle helmets, but sometimes motorcycle helmets, especially if you go and fast. Elbow Pads, maybe wrist guards, may be kneepads, but you know, that doesn't look so good. You certainly want a motorcycle h lmet that still shows off yo r waxed mustache when you're iding one of these things.

Christine Malec:

I worry about that all the time. We love making this podcast. If you love hearing it, perhaps you'll consider supporting its creation and development by becoming a patron. We've set up a Patreon page to help cover the costs of putting the show together. You can contribute as a listener or as a sponsor to help ensure that accessible and entertaining journalism continues to reach our community. Visit patreon.com/talk Description To me that's pa t ar e o n.com/talk description to me have feedback or suggestions of what you'd like to hear about here's how to get in touch with us. Our email address is top description to me@gmail.com. Our Facebook page is called Talk description to me. Our website is talk description to me.com and you can follow us on Twitter at talk Description.

Mobility scooters
Ebikes, cargo bikes, rickshaws
Scooters
Electric unicycles and skateboards